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But, I also, so far, prefer ignorance about the details of what could or could not happen at labor. So I'm a bad audience for that. I definitely want to know how much of the information included, the statistics, etc, which are some of the most informative and disturbing about the book, have changed in the last decade. Overall a very good and necessary read, and for me, reassuring in its darkness - it's okay to think that pregnancy is really fucking hard and that you're not cut out for it.

That message isn't presented in a lot of the other media available, and I wish it was. Aug 16, Meridith rated it did not like it. Dripping with entitlement on every page. Newsflash: upper middle class women used to getting everything on a silver platter discover as they approach now-or-never childbearing years that -quelle horreur! Beware of the high-pitched whining throughout.

Misconceptions (Its Complicated Book 1) pdf

It makes for a difficult read. I couldn't finish it. I rarely do that. I found the ethnocentricity exceedingly overpowering, and the privilege of moneyed whiteness to be a big yawn. If you want a good feminist read on the role of birthing, breastfeeding and mothering then read Gabrielle Palmer's "The Politics of Breastfeeding" - that will really take you into socio-economic dynamics, commercial protectionism and the patriarchy with MUCH more vigour, zero self-consciousness, and a real discussion on sexual politics.

And, then, f I couldn't finish it. And, then, for a rational discussion on birth choices that transcends political agenda of the author and busts a whole bunch of birthing myths, read Marjorie Tew's "Safer Birth? Tew is a statistician, well-outside of the political interests of the birthing 'industry' who conducts statistical and historical analysis of birthing, outcomes, and the health professionals involved.

I had read these two aforementioned titles years before I came across Wolf's book, and it pales in comparison. I'm sure that this is a ground breaking book for many women who are still conditioned to believe "doctors and hospitals have your best interests at heart", and as I already knew this was a dangerous misconception, 'Misconceptions' stated the obvious to me.


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I'm glad she is in a position to highlight the issues that are relevant to her socio-economic status, because it will reach a number of women who are inclined to fall victim to the arrogance of similarly educated professionals women who have been to university are more likely to go along with the skewed 'professiona' opinion of someone else who has a uni certificate on their office wall and less likely to question them. Meanwhile, if you really want to gain insight into mothering, you'll need to read a few books written by better positioned people. For the lay person, both of the aforementioned books are very readable.

Sorry, Naomi, I just couldn't! Aug 09, Leseparatist rated it liked it Shelves: memoir , , research. I found the style annoying at times - some of the "discoveries" made by the writer sounded pretty common sense to me, but perhaps that's the time and space making a difference. The discussion of abortion did not impress me at all, and I thought her speaking about her privilege - as if it was a burden - felt a bit fake at times. But I did enjoy the focus given to the repercussions of the pregnancy and parenthood on straight couples. I still think she was a bit too apologetic in her description of I found the style annoying at times - some of the "discoveries" made by the writer sounded pretty common sense to me, but perhaps that's the time and space making a difference.

I still think she was a bit too apologetic in her description of the men regressing into pre-feminist roles "they're good husbands! I had expected it to be much worse. Jul 13, Emily rated it really liked it. I found this to be an eye-opening critique of maternity practices in the U.

This book is not without its flaws not the least of them the ethnocentric viewpoint , but it weaves the personal, political, and cultural together into a compelling read.

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Not just for pregnant women, Wolf has written a well-researched book about topics that makes the usual "What to Expect" language about pregnancy and birthing look all-too-tame. Really, though, who doesn't get squeamish thinking about things like epis I found this to be an eye-opening critique of maternity practices in the U. Really, though, who doesn't get squeamish thinking about things like episiotomies and grunting on all fours in order to give birth? Her mission to "tell the truth" about the medical maternity complex is certainly the truth from her own point of view, but it's backed up by a lot of research and sheds light on an under-studied, yet vital, part of modern life and Wolf is an excellent guide.

Mar 02, Amy rated it did not like it. This book is busted. It's about all the terrible injustices a rich white highly educated straight married woman experiences when she is pregnant.

It's Complicated: Misconceptions (Volume 1) - Erika Renee Land • BookLikes (ISBN)

For example, she's not thin anymore and people seem to treat her differently. Can you believe it?? Apr 21, Kate Lansky rated it really liked it Shelves: pregnancy. When I picked up this book, I admit that I wasn't quite expecting what I got. I figured it would read kind of like Pushed - what I got was something else entirely. What I got was Naomi Wolf's personal experiences beautifully framing an anthropological look at birth in America through interviews with friends and other acquaintances.

Naomi is a bit of a poet, I think. She is a strong woman, a feminist, an artist. It was very easy to identify with her as a human being, to see in her a reflection of When I picked up this book, I admit that I wasn't quite expecting what I got.

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It was very easy to identify with her as a human being, to see in her a reflection of myself. It made reading her work a familiar thing, a deeply informative and personal act. I think some people will be a bit resistant to a section on women and the loss of power in relationships with their partners after the birth of a child. I could feel her raw emotion as she was writing, the sense of societal and personal betrayal throughout.

And though I could understand what she was saying and could identify with it completely - even without having kids - I don't know that everyone will react well to the emotion that is sunk into that section of the book. Still - I found myself thinking "yes, this is how women feel - this is how I feel, just looking forward and knowing what pregnancy and childbirth will bring.

Our culture doesn't dwell on those changes. We as women are expected to be static creatures who work until we give birth, then come back a few weeks later completely unaffected by what has just occurred - and by that I don't mean just the birth of a child, but the changes that take place to our bodies, our minds, our souls over the course of pregnancy and what follows. We are changed, for better or for worse, and this is a secret often tucked away in our culture.

Naomi walks us through those changes, through the fear, and allows us to admit the truth of it. I will say this. The book and Naomi freely admits this herself focuses on a very specific segment of the population. It focuses on middle class white women, usually working, and largely feminists. It is for this reason that I call the work an anthropological study, and I think that if it were labeled as such rather than as a book strictly for expectant mothers, it becomes an understandable level of focus.

I would, however, suggest that you go into the reading with that knowledge.

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Definitely a worthwhile read. Aug 02, Leslie rated it it was ok Shelves: book-club-reads , library-books. Misconceptions is all about the "ugly" side of pregnancy, childbirth, and motherhood. While it's nice that something like this exists that's not sugar-coated, I had a really hard time reading it.

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Everything was so negative and it made me feel guilty for having a good pregnancy, childbirth, and feeling happy about being a mother. Why does every sentence in this book have to be a complaint, rant, or pity party? Parts of it felt judgmental or made me feel shame - for instance, when she discusses mo Misconceptions is all about the "ugly" side of pregnancy, childbirth, and motherhood.

Parts of it felt judgmental or made me feel shame - for instance, when she discusses morning sickness. At one point she discusses her struggle with morning sickness and feels the need to defend it by saying "interestingly pregnancies complicated by nausea and vomiting have a more favorable outcome than do those without.

Some of the things she complains about seem unnecessary.